Tuesday, April 25, 2017
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Lovington teen ‘working hard’ to stay ahead

A sophomore and already headed to Stanford

Dorothy N. Fowler

News-Sun

Although Lovington High School sophomore Daylan Flemmons had thought about attending Stanford University after she graduates from high school, it was a plan that was “way in the future.” Now, far from being a distant dream, Flemmons will attend Stanford this summer. She’ll be earning college credits at the university ranked No. 1 in the United States by several ranking organizations. F l e m m o n s scored 1420 of the PSAT (PreliminarySAT), a score high enough to attract the attention of admissions officers who will be, if they aren’t already, trying to recruit her to come to their school. Officials at Stanford contacted Flemmons after results of her PSAT reached them, inviting her to come to the university and attend for-college-credit classes for eight weeks this summer. Stanford, which is one of the premier research institutions in the nation is at the top of Flemmons’ list of universities she would consider attending. She plans to major in bio-medical engineering, said, “I feel called to work in the medical field and I believe engineering will let me help more people than any other field would. And Stanford has an outstanding bio-medical engineering facility.” Flemmons said she is currently at the top of her class. “I’m working hard to stay there,” she said. In addition to her academic work, Flemmons is involved in several other school activities. “I’m a percussionist in the band. I belong to FFA (Future Farmers of America), participated in the Science Olympiad, was in the Quest program and in National Honor Society. And I am a member of First Assembly in Lovington,” she said. Lovington High School science teacher Janet Bruelhart spoke highly of Flemmons. “She’s a great student, always enthusiastic. She’s eager to ask questions about anything she doesn’t understand. I hope she really enjoys her time at Stanford,” Bruelhart said. “But she may come back knowing more than her teachers know!”

Flemmons and her family are eager for her to go and they immediately began an effort to raise money needed to pay for tuition, transportation, housing and incidental expenses. She needs at least $15,000 and would prefer not to incur any student debt even before she graduates from high school.

They have organized a 5K run to be held at Chapparal Park 7:30-10 p.m. on April 28. Registration is $35 for adults and $20 for children between the ages of two and 20. Pre-registering will ensure that participants will receive a T-shirt. Pre-registration is open on-line at glowrun.eventsmart.com and payment can be made through PayPal. People may also register after April 16, when pre-registration closes.

Dorothy N. Fowler can be reached at 391-5446 or by email.

Is Jal going to run out of water?

Is Jal going to run out of water?

Is Jal going to dry up and blow away in the next few years?

Levi Hill

News-Sun

At a Jal City Council meeting March 27, Mayor Cheryl Chance said she was told just such a scenerio could happen.

“Somebody told me from the state engineer’s office that we were soon not going to have any water in the aquifer because of Midland,” Chance said following a discussion about a state Oil Conservation Division report that showed a salt water disposal well owned by Oilfield Water Logistics about one mile southwest of Jal could contaminate future drinking water supplies. “I was told it came from the top person,” Chance added. “It is kind of scary when someone tells you their boss said we are going to be out of water.”

Chance wouldn’t say who gave her the information when questioned by Jal City Manager Bob Gallagher, but Gallagher said the statement — by whoever it was — is false.

“That is an asinine statement,” Gallagher said at the meeting. “If that is the case and they have not contacted the city or any ranchers …”

So is Jal going to run out of water in the next few years? According to a recent study of the town’s water supply conducted by Albuquerque firm Souder, Miller and Associates, Jal’s current aquifer is predicted to last the community 20-30 more years even with the draw-down by Midland, which drilled several wells across the state line in Texas and for the past two years has been pulling as much as 10 million gallons a day of water from the aquifer.

State Engineer Tom Blaine told the News-Sun he doesn’t know where the information Chance received came from, but it was not his office.

“We would never make a statement like that,” Blaine said. “If Jal is going to run out of water in two-three years, I would be down there personally talking to the city council and trying to figure out ways we could work through it. We have not heard any of those figures and we are the keepers of the data.”

Blaine said Andy Morley, district 2 manager for the office, which covers Roswell and the Lea County areas, did speak with the mayor prior to the meeting and she may have misinterpreted information he had provided her.

“I did have an opportunity to speak with her earlier that week,” Morley said. “I am working with hydrology as we speak to try and find out what the lifespan of the Jal aquifer is. As far as the mayor’s concern, it is a good concern. Anyone in that area should be concerned. We are extracting water at a greater rate than the recharge. As far as predicting it will be depleted in a two-year period, we don’t know that.”

He said the state office looks out at time frames around 2045 and tries to base water consumption projections going forward off current data taken from monitoring wells in the area.

“I don’t know anybody can project the deadline or life expectancy of the aquifer,” he said. “We have a good idea that as things continue to deplete in this area what draw downs could be.”

Is a draw-down happening? According to data take from the Advisory Committee on Water Information website, a Texas Water Development Board well located across the state line in Winkler County near the site of the Midland water wells shows that water levels have fallen sharply since early 2015. Midland began pumping water from the basin in December 2014.

On Feb. 17, 2015 the well’s depth to water from the surface was 138 feet. A measurement taken Feb. 7 of this year shows the depth to water had dropped to 149 feet.

Data taken from the U.S. Geological Survey website shows one of their monitoring wells in the area of Jal’s water wells has also seen a drop. That well came in at 282 feet to water in July 2015. In July 2016 the water level had dropped to 294 feet. That is the last year of data available for the well.

Jal’s long-term water future remains uncertain and as the community looks to future water sources such as the Capitan Reef aquifer — a non-potable water source that could potentially be made into drinking water in the future — protecting future supplies from contamination will likely be a major concern.

Severe weather to hit Lea today

Severe weather to hit Lea today

Tornadoes possible with storm

 

DENISE MARQUEZ

NEWS-SUN

Severe weather is forecasted for the Hobbs area Wednesday afternoon and evening with strong winds, hail and possible tornado developments. 

Matt Salerno, meteorologist with the Midland National Weather Service, said thunderstorms started developing Wednesday morning and started moving through northern Lea County. 

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DNA links suspect to four burglaries

DNA links suspect to four burglaries

NEWS-SUN STAFF REPORT

A Lovington man linked by DNA to a 2016 burglary scene was arrested Monday by Hobbs police after a woman reported her Toyota Tundra truck missing from her residence.

Ubaldo Anchondo, Jr., 38, was charged with unlawful taking of motor vehicle and four counts of burglary,both fourth-degree felonies. He was booked at the Hobbs City Jail. The Hobbs Magistrate Court set a $20,000 bond on the burglary counts.

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City hesitant to OK hiring of officials’ relatives
Mayor Cobb

Mayor Cobb

Denise Marquez

NEWS-SUN

The Hobbs City Commission was hesitant to approve the publication of an ordinance amendment that would allow certain relatives of the city commission and city manager to be hired as seasonal or temporary employees by the city.

During Monday’s city commission meeting, the Hobbs commission voted 5-2 for the publication of an ordinance that would amend a city rule related to nepotism. Commissioners Marshall Newman and Garry Buie voted against the publication. 

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Charges dismissed in human trafficking case

Charges dismissed in human trafficking case

Kelly Farrell

NEWS-SUN

The felony human trafficking charges filed against a West Texas man in late November were dismissed “without prejudice” last week in Hobbs Magistrate Court. 

Lubbock resident Anthony Edric Thomas, 47, was arrested Dec. 12 by the Lea County Sheriff’s Department on a warrant for two counts of human trafficking, a third-degree felony. The Hobbs Police Department filed the criminal complaint on Nov. 30, which alleged Thomas brought a Texas woman to Hobbs for prostitution at a hotel.

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Suspect in 2015 murder out on probation arrested again

Suspect could serve full suspended sentence

 

Kelly Farrell

NEWS-SUN

Hobbs resident David Coelho is back in jail on an alleged probation violation less than a week after being sentenced to supervised probation in the June 2015 homicide of Julio Gonzalez.

Coelho, 34, was arrested on a warrant Monday by Hobbs police and charged with probation violation, a fourth-degree felony. He is detained at the Lea County Detention Center, as of Tuesday.

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’Scoops are back!

’Scoops are back!

New KaleidoScoops open for business

Curtis C. Wynne

News-Sun

KaleidoScoops is back in Hobbs.

Under new management and in a new location, at 3420 N. Grimes St. Suite 300, the popular ice cream vendor opened to the public on Tuesday.

After 17 years, the previous Kaleidoscoops location on Turner Street closed at the end of June to the dismay of many Hobbs area residents. Clancy Dean said he and his wife Sabrina purchased the franchise from the previous owners, Jay and Susan Patton.

“We have ice cream, sandwiches, shakes, soup, nachos,” Clancy said. “We have basically anything to do with ice cream, including shakes, cones, dips and chocolate. We’ve got Italian sodas.”

Sabrina added, “Cakes are coming soon.”

Unlike the previous location in Hobbs, this Kaleidoscoops lacks a drive-through for now. The ice cream shop is situated between two other businesses that share parking spaces at the Bloom Shopping Mall across Grimes Street from Undergrounds Coffee and across West Spears Drive from Permian Toyota.

Clancy said, “Maybe someday in the future at another location, but for now, no drive through.”

Encouraging the ice cream loving public to come on in, he said the hours of operation are 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday-Saturday and 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday. Asked about employees, Sabrina said, “We have a full staff and two students.”

Clancy credited his wife and store manager Harlee Lester with performing most of the work preparing the store for opening as he has another job working for Concho Resources Inc.

According to the Kaleido-Scoops website, “At Kaleido-Scoops, we are proud to serve premium, hand dipped ice cream. Our ice creams use unique recipes especially for KaleidoScoops. Over 75 flavors of creamy, delicious ice cream, yogurt, sherbet and sorbet are the building blocks of an endless variety of frozen treats. Our waffle cones are made fresh daily to ensure top quality taste.”

The website goes on to point out that not all flavors are avail able at all stores, but customers are encouraged to recommend any changes they wish.

Curtis Wynne may be contacted at 575-391-5436.

Pilfered pastry lands wanted man in jail

Pilfered pastry lands wanted man in jail

KELLY FARRELL

NEWS-SUN

One fugitive's sweet tooth landed him in jail on more than a dozen charges after an employee spotted him allegedly eating a donut from a local store and then trying to leave without paying.

Gregory Mendoza, 35, was charged by Hobbs police with shoplifting and concealing identity, both petty misdemeanors. He was booked at the Hobbs City Jail.

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Hobbs commission says ‘no’ to Murphy severance contract

$200,000 contract rejected, Murphy could still get $306,000

LEVI HILL

NEWS-SUN

Sparks flew at the Hobbs City Commission Monday night as commissioners split 4-3 over giving City Manager J.J. Murphy a modified severance contract that would have had him coming back to the city as a consultant until June 30, 2018.

It appears Murphy will be out the door either way on June 30, 2017 as the commission cannot come to an agreement over offering Murphy a new contract. His first five-year contract ends at the end of the fiscal year.

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